Thursday, August 31, 2006

BLOG DAY 2006









I never thought writing a post for Blog day would be so tedious, not because I had not found any new blogs, but because I had so many that I did not know which one to list down... :-(

I found out about Blog Day from Paz. BlogDay was started as a way for bloggers to discover new blogs of different cultures, views and areas of interest. More information is available at
Paz's blog.

First of all, I would like to thank Paz for listing my blog...As a newbie in blogsphere, I have been discovering new blogs everyday and I found it very tough to select just five blogs... Yet, I have managed to list out some of the interesting blogs I found recently:

1. Raji's En Iniya Ninaivugal
Raji writes about memories. Yes, memories and thoughts which all of us have treasured in our minds. Her eloquence keeps one hooked to the lines till the very end.

2. Orchidea's Viaggi & sapori
Orchidea blogs about Italian food. It's a treasure trove of recipes and beautiful pictures .

3. Shynee's Indian Potpourri-Recipes,Culture,Ethnicity
As the name suggests, it is a potpourri of all cuisines with very interesting writeups and colorful photographs. I love this blog for the numerous seafood recipes..

4. Balaji S Rajan's Reflections Of Mind
Balaji writes with a strong social awareness which drives home the point and keeps us wondering long after the webpage is closed.

5. Nicky & Oliver's Delicious days
This blog needs no introduction at all. It has been selected as one of 50 coolest websites of 2006 by Time. The blog is so full of gorgeous pictures and recipes that it feels like a beautiful cookbook spread out for us.

Apart from the blogs mentioned above, the blogs which I adore are:

Indira's Mahanandi

Sailaja's Sailu's Food

Archana's Spicyana

Paz's Cooking Adventures

Kay's Towards a better tomorrow

Shilpa's Aayi's Recipes

Shankari's Stream of Consciousness

Karthi Kannan's KitchenMate

Revathi's En Ulagam

Let me stop here, lest I be disqualified from Blog Day! :-)

The list is very long and all my favorite blogs are listed in the links section.. Happy Reading!


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Pagarkai KaaraKozhambu - Kaakarkaya Kaaram Pulusu - Bitter Gourd Spicy Curry

Pagarkai Kaara Kozhambu - Kaakarkaya Kaaram Pulusu - Bitter Gourd Spicy Curry
My husband is a fan of bitter Gourd and I try to make it in as many ways as possible, from slow frying to stuffing and everything in between. My favorite is a gravy recipe which is tangy, spicy and masks the bitterness.

I love the Kaarakozhambu my mom makes and though I haven't reached her level of perfection, I have done my best. In the usual recipe, coconut milk or ground poppy seeds are added for thickness. I added almonds for thickness, in an attempt to cut down the unwanted cholesterol and my tastebuds did not complain!

Whenever I make bittergourd, I cut it up, add lots of salt and let it sit for about 30 minutes. After that, I rinse it with lots of water. This way, some of the bitterness is lost.

Here is the recipe:

Ingredients:

Bitter Gourd - 2
Onion - 3/4 of a big onion
Tomato - 1 big
Garlic Flakes - 4 big ones
Tamarind - A big lemon sized ball

Sugar/Jaggery/Brown Sugar - A pinch or two

Oil - 1 Tablespoon

Mustard Seeds - 1 Teaspoon
Urad Dal - 1 Teaspoon
Fenugreek Seeds - A pinch
Jeera - 1 Teaspoon
Curry Leaves - 6
Turmeric - A pinch
Chilli Powder - 3 to 4 Teaspoons
Dhaniya Powder - 2 to 3 Teaspoons

Blanched Almonds - 6

Soak tamarind in a little water and extract the juice.

Grind Onion, Tomato, Garlic and Almonds coarsely. Heat oil in a saucepan and add mustard seeds, jeera and urad dal. After the mustard seeds splutter, add fenugreek seeds and curry leaves. Take care not to brown the fenugreek seeds. Add the ground onion - tomato mixture and cook till the raw smell disappears. Add the bitter gourd pieces, salt, turmeric, chilli powder and dhaniya powder. Cook till the bitter gourd is done. Add the tamarind extract, sugar and cook till the gravy reaches a thick consistency. Remove from heat and garnish with coriander.

There is another variation to this dish which is as follows:

1. Grind almonds to a fine paste with a little water.
2. Finely dice onion + tomato and crush the garlic.
3. After the seasoning, saute onion + tomato till the tomato breaks down.
4. Add bitter groud + garlic + Salt + Dhaniya Powder + Chilli Powder and saute for a couple of minutes more.
5. Add the almond paste, tamarind extract, sugar and enough water to cook the bitter gourd.
6. Simmer till the curry reaches gravy consistency.
7. Remove from heat and garnish with coriander.

This is my entry to the Curry Mela hosted by Anthony of Anthony's Kitchen.

Wednesday, August 30, 2006

MulaiKeerai Kadaiyal - Amaranth Curry

Amaranth Leaves - MulaiKeerai - Thotakoora
I found this greens at an Indian store last week and was I thrilled! One of the things I miss about my hometown is the wide variety of greens we could use, right from SiruKeerai, Ponnanganni Keerai, Agathi Keerai....The list is long and I could go on and on...I know those greens only by their Tamil names...

Oh, I forgot to name those green beauties I found. They are Amaranth leaves or MulaiKeerai or ThotaKoora.

My mom makes MulaiKeerai in a different way, without using dal. I grew up to like it a lot, though it might be a little bland to some palates.

Amaranth Leaves Curry

Here is the recipe:

Ingredients:

Amaranth Leaves - About 2 to 2.5 cups

Water - 1 Cup

Turmeric - A pinch
Salt - As per taste

Seasoning:

Garlic Flakes - 3 big ones
Mustard Seeds - 1 Teaspoon
Dry Red Chilli - 4
Urad Dal - 1 Teaspoon
Jeera - 1/2 Teaspoon
Oil - 2 Teaspoons

Chop Amaranth leaves and cook them in water, with a pinch of turmeric. Use a masher or a blender and blend till coarse. Add salt as per taste.

Crush garlic flakes and break dry red chillies into small pieces.

Heat oil and add mustard seeds, jeera, urad dal, red chillies and garlic flakes. After the mustard seeds splutter and the garlic flakes turn light brown, add it to the amaranth leaves and serve.
This curry can be used with rice or rotis.

Tuesday, August 29, 2006

Black Eyed Beans Rasam - Alsandhalu Rasam - Karamani Rasam

Black-Eyed Beans Rasam - Alsandhalu Rasam - Karamani Rasam
After a nearly two week hiatus, I am back again with a simple yet different recipe. I made rasam with a twist. The original recipe is of Mysore Rasam. But instead of toor dal, I added black-eyed beans (Alsandhalu/ Karamani). Sounds eccentric? But it tastes good...and it is a relief from the soaring dal prices...Let me get to the recipe:

Recipe:

Ingredients:

For Powder:

Toor Dal - 2 Teaspoons
Channa Dal - 2 Teaspoons
Black Pepper - 1/4 Teaspoon
Coriander Seeds - 2 Teaspoons
Dry Red Chilli - 1
Dry Coconut - 1 Teaspoon

Tomato - 2 Medium ones
Water - 4 Cups

Boiled Black-eyed Beans - 3 Tablespoons
Turmeric - A pinch
Salt - As per taste

Seasoning:

Mustard Seeds - 1 Teaspoon
Curry Leaves - 6 to 7
Oil - 2 Teaspoons

For Garnishing:
Coriander (Chopped) - 1 Tablespoon

Soak black-eyed beans for about 6 hours and pressure cook till very soft. Mash and keep aside. Chop tomatoes into little cubes, add 4 cups of water, a pinch of turmeric and cook till done. Roast all the ingredients one by one, except coconut under the For Powder section and grind to a fine powder.

Add 3 tablespoons of the mashed beans to the cooked tomatoes and add the powder. Add salt to taste and cook for 5 more minutes. Heat oil and add mustard seeds and curry leaves. After they splutter, add it to the rasam and serve.

Wednesday, August 16, 2006

Wheat Rawa Vegetable Medley

Wheat Rawa Medley
I made this concotion yesterday for our dinner. Most of the time, our dinner is very light, consisting of traditional Indian breakfast recipes. Yesterday, I tried a different recipe with wheat rawa other than the usual upma, which resembles bisibela bath to some extent. Here is the recipe.

Recipe:

Ingredients:

Wheat Rawa/Cracked Wheat - 2 cups
Carrots - 3
Beans - 3/4 Cup chopped
Potatoes - 1 Medium
Onion - 1/2 of a big onion
Tomato - 1 Medium
Ginger - 1 inch piece - Crushed
Turmeric - A pinch
Chilli Powder - 2 Teaspoons
Sambar Powder - 3 Teaspoons
Amchur Powder (Mango Powder) - 1 Teaspoon

Seasoning:

Mustard Seeds - 1 Teaspoon
Jeera - 1 Teaspoon
Curry Leaves - 5
Urad Dal - 1 Teaspoon
Cinnamon - 1 inch stick
Cloves - 2

Oil - 1 Tablespoon
Water - 6 Cups

Chop all the vegetables.

Heat oil in a pan and add mustard seeds. After they splutter, add jeera, urad dal, cinnamon, cloves and curry leaves. Add onions and ginger and fry till light brown. Add tomatoes next. Fry till light brown. Add the vegetables, a pinch of turmeric, chilli powder and fry again. Add 6 cups of water and salt and bring it to a boil.

Add the wheat rawa and keep stirring to prevent lumps. Let it simmer till cooked. Add more water if the consistency is too thick for your taste. Add sambar powder and amchur powder, stir and cook for a minute more and remove from heat. Garnish with coriander leaves. Add amchur powder only if the tomatoes are not sour enough.

Roasted Channa Dal Chutney:

Roasted Channa Dal (Pottukadalai/ Putnala Pappu) - 3/4 cup
Green Chillies - 3
Tamarind - A gooseberry sizd ball
Jeera - 1 Teaspoon

Grind all the ingredients together with a little water. Season with mustard seeds and curry leaves.
Serve the wheat rawa medley with the chutney.

Monday, August 14, 2006

Appala Kozhambu - Papad Curry

Appala Kozhambu

Yet another entry for IDFP...celebrating our country's pride...This recipe reminds me of Madras. The quaint old city where ancient traditions rub shoulder with modern landscape. Madras has a magic of its own, with its beautiful beaches, numerous temples, conservative outlook, lively people, the much notorious 'Madras Bashai' and the omnipresent heat and humidity. Madras is very dear to me, has a special place in my heart and has been a part of me starting from my parents..

My dear aunt Kanchana (mom's sister) lives in Madras and her home has been my holiday getaway, as far as my memory goes. The shopping sprees, walks down the beaches and the hilarious situations arising when four girls get together on a busy Ranganathan street evoke peels of laughter even now.

Ah...good old Madras...This post isn't enough to talk of its granduer. I will save it for another day.

The recipe which I made today is Appala Kozhambu.. A unique blend of appalams (Urad dal wafers) and channa dal. To the recipe now..

Recipe Source: My Mom

Ingredients:

Appalams - 6
Onion - 1/2 of a big onion
Tomato - 1 big
Garlic - 3 to 4 big flakes
Ginger - 1 inch piece

Channa dal - 3 fistfuls
Mustard seeds - 1 Teaspoon
Urad Dal - 1 Teaspoon
Saunf - 1/2 Teaspoon
Chilli Powder - 2 Teaspoons
Dhaniya Powder - 2 Teaspoons
Turmeric - A pinch
Salt - As per taste

Oil - 1 Tablespoon

Soak channa dal in water for some time and pressure cook till soft. Fry appalams and keep aside. Chop onion and tomato to small cubes. Crush garlic and ginger.
Heat oil in a pan and add mustard seeds, urad dal, saunf and curry leaves. After the mustard seeds splutter, add onion, ginger and garlic. Fry till light brown. Add tomato, chilli powder, turmeric, dhaniya powder and salt. Fry till the tomato is almost cooked. Add the channa dal and cook on a medium heat till a semi liquid consistency is reached. Break each appalam into 3 or 4 pieces and add to the curry. Simmer on a low heat for 3 or 4 minutes. Remove from heat and garnish with coriander leaves.

Sunday, August 13, 2006

Dried Shrimp And Dosakaya Curry - Dosakaya Endu Royilu Koora

Dried Shrimp with Dosakaya
As I was pondering on a suitable entry for the Independence Day Food Parade, conducted by Indira of Mahanandi, my hubby mentioned a recipe from his hometown in coastal Andhra Pradesh - Dried Shrimp with Dosakaya or Dosakaya Endu Royilu Koora.

Well, I made it and it was our Sunday lunch. We got dried shrimp from a Chinese food market and dosakaya (a kind of cucumber) from an Indian Store. It's a pretty simple recipe, without a lot of aromatic ingredients, except jeera and mustard seeds. The shrimp blends well with the dosakaya and makes a delightful curry.

So, here it is..one of my entries to our Independence Day Food Parade...

Recipe:

Recipe Source: My Mom-In-Law

Ingredients:

Dried Shrimp - 2 Tablespoons
Dosakaya - 1
Onion - 1/4 of a big onion
Tomato - 1 big
Chilli Powder - 2 Teaspoons
Turmeric - a Pinch
Salt - As per taste

Oil - 1 to 2 Tablespoons

Mustard Seeds - 1 Teaspoon
Jeera - 1 Teaspoon
Urad Dal - 1 Teaspoon

Curry Leaves - 5

Coriander - 1 Tablespoon chopped

Soak dried shrimp in hot water for 30 minutes. This suppresses the odour to a very large extent. Dice the onion and tomato. Peel the dosakaya, remove the seeds if they are tough and cube. Heat oil in a pan and add mustard seeds. After they splutter, add jeera, urad dal and curry leaves and fry till light brown. Add onion and fry till light brown. Add tomato, salt and turmeric. Fry for some time. Add dried shrimp, dosakaya and chilli powder and fry for some time. Add about 3 cups of water and cook on medium heat till done. Remove from heat, garnish with coriander and serve. The amount of water will vary depending on the dosakaya.

This recipe is for seafood lovers. As all seafood, shrimp has a distinct odour and dried shrimps have a much stronger scent. So, use it at your own discretion. :-)

Thursday, August 10, 2006

Pachi Pulusu - Raw Rasam

Pachi Pulusu
This is a traditional Andhra recipe from my hubby's hometown. I first had a taste of this recipe after marriage and the tanginess of the tamarind, the heat of the chillies and the crispiness of the onions bowled me over. It's very simple to prepare, it took me hardly 10 minutes to put it together. It can be had with rice or by itself as a soup or rasam.

Recipe:

Recipe Source: My Mom-in-law

Ingredients:

Tamarind - 1 big lemon sized ball
Onion - 1/2 of a big one - Finely Chopped
Green Chillies - 2 Split
Jaggery/ Sugar - A pinch
Dry Red Chillies - 2

Seasoning:

Mustard Seeds - 1 Teaspoon
Curry Leaves - 5 - 6
Jeera - 1 Teaspoon

Oil - 2 Teaspoons

Fry dry red chillies in a little bit of oil and grind to a fine powder.

Soak tamarind in 3 cups of water along with salt. Extract the juice and discard the pulp. Add the onions, green chillies and the ground chilli powder to the tamarind juice.

Heat oil and add mustard seeds. After they splutter, add jeera and curry leaves. Pour this seasoning over the tamarind mixture. Add a pinch of jaggery. Let it stand for 30 minutes before serving.

Wednesday, August 09, 2006

Radish Kosambari

Radish Kosambari
Kosambari is basically a salad specialty of Karnataka. Traditionally its made with green gram dal and cucumber. This is a variation. If you are like me, who never liked radishes, then this recipe is for you...

I never had much of a liking for radish...I used to be put off by its pungent smell and taste...Not until a friend's mom introduced me to this recipe... I was surprised at how the pungent taste of the radish simply vanishes in this salad..

Recipe:

Ingredients:

Small Red Radish - 7 to 8
Shredded fresh or dry coconut - 2 Teaspoons
Lemon Juice - 1 - 2 Teaspoons
Salt - As per taste
Coriander leaves - for Garnishing

Seasoning:

Green Chillies - 2 Split
Mustard Seeds - 1 Teaspoon
Jeera - 1 Teaspoon
Curry Leaves - 3 - 4

Oil - 1 Teaspoon

Grate the radish, add coconut and lemon juice to it. Mix well. Heat oil in a saucepan and add mustard seeds. After they splutter, add jeera, curry leaves and green chillies. Fry for a minute. Add to the radish mixture. Add salt and garnish with coriander leaves.

Add salt just prior to serving to avoid getting the salad soggy.

My First Fondant Cake

My First Fondant Cake
I was digging through my old photo albums when I found this photograph of a cake I made in January this year, for the first birthday of my friend's kid. It's not a great photo and the date stamp is wrong, but that was all I had and I wanted to share it with you all.

I had decorated the cake with homemade fondant. It was a very simple, basic sort of decoration with a kid's theme. It was my first time at fondant and the result was pretty good, with no tearing or smudging of the fondant. The cake itself was an unleveled one made from a store bought chocolate mix.

Here's the recipe:

Marshmallow Fondant:

Marshmallows - 16 ounces white mini marshmallows
Sugar - 2 pounds Powdered sugar
Shortening - 1/2 Cup
Water - 2 to 5 tablespoons

Melt marshmallows with 2 tablespoons of water in a microwave for 21/2 minutes, stirring every 30 seconds. Place 3/4 of the powdered sugar on the top of the melted marshmallow mix and stir with a greased ladle, till the marshmallows and the sugar have mixed to some extent, though not thoroughly. The marshmallow mix would have cooled down now. Grease your hands and start kneading the mix like dough. Your hands will get sticky but keep kneading and use the shortening to grease your hands. Add the rest of the sugar and keep kneading. Whenever your hands get very sticky, use some shortening, but not more than the half cup which has been prescribed. If the mix is tearing, add 1/2 a tablespoon of water at a time and knead it in. It usually takes about 8 mintes to get a firm, smooth, elastic ball which will not tear when stretched.

To decorate, first apply a layer of frosting to the cake. The frosting helps the fondant to stick to the cake.

Coming to the fondant, roll out the fondant to the size of your cake, as you would do with chappathi dough. The recipe I have give is more than enough to cover a single layer of 13 by 9 inch cake. You can also add colors to the fondant and make shapes out of it. I made the butterfly and the flower and attached it to the base using a little water. For adding color, please use gel- based colors. Liquid or powder colors have a tendency to interfere with the elasticity of the fondant.

When it comes to marshmallows, one of the ingredients used for their making is gelatin. Gelatin as you would know can be derived from plant or animal source. Those who have qualms about using a animal source, do check the ingredients list on your marshmallows. I chose marshmallows which used gelatin from a plant source.

Tuesday, August 08, 2006

Almond Milk

Almond Milk

Almond milk is a milky drink made from ground almonds. Almond milk contains no cholesterol or lactose and can be used as a substitute for animal milk in many recipes. Historically, almond milk was also called amygdalate.

Almonds are high in monounsaturated fats, the same type of health-promoting fats as are found in olive oil, which have been associated with reduced risk of heart disease.

Here is the recipe for almond milk. This is different from our usual Badam milk, which is prepared from milk. This recipe uses only water. It's a no cholesterol, low calorie drink.

Recipe:

Ingredients:

Almonds - 1/2 Cup (Blanched and Skinned)
Warm Water - 2 Cups
Cardamom - 1
Sugar - 2 Teaspoons or Honey

Roast the almonds on a low heat till they turn light brown. Soak them in warm water and refrigerate for a day. Grind with cardamom and sugar. Strain through a filter and serve.

Letting the almonds soak for a day is supposed to activate them. You can skip the soaking, if you want to make the milk immediately.

I have not used any extract to flavor this milk, as I wanted to keep it simple, natural with a low sugar content. You can add vanilla or almond extract, according to taste.

I don't have a great liking for almond skin, so I have used skinned almonds. You can use them otherwise. Almonds like other nuts containing oils, will turn rancid if not stored properly. Refrigerating almonds extends their shelf life considerably.

Black-Eyed Beans Curry

Black Eyed Beans Curry
Black- Eyed beans are known as alsandhalu in Telugu and karamani in Tamil. Black-eyed beans are rich in soluble fiber, which helps to eliminate cholesterol from the body. They are a good source of folate, potassium, copper, phosphorous and manganese. As a high-potassium, low-sodium food they help reduce blood pressure.

Way back in my grandmother's village, on one of my numerous childhood visits with cousins and sisters, there used to be this fun, campfire sort of snack. Fresh picked alsandhalu would be roasted in the dying embers of the afternoon fire. The result - smoky flavoured, smooth textured beans ready to be devoured. In our excitement to get to the goodies, we kids used to burn our tender fingers trying to open the hot outer casings, only to be chided affectionately. It was a simple snack, the preparation alone providing the much needed entertainment to kids holidaying in a remote village.

Today, I have no dying embers in my kitchen, but my memory is still fresh and if I close my eyes I can almost smell the smoked beans.

For our Sunday meal, I made a curry out of Alsandhalu. It's a lively sort of recipe with tanginess and spiciness going hand in hand and goes very well with rice, rotis and ragi mudda.


Recipe Source: My Mom

Recipe:

Ingredients:

Black- Eyed Beans - 1 Cup

Garlic - 4 - 5 flakes - Crushed
Tamarind - A gooseberry sized ball
Onion - 3/4th of a big onion - Finely Chopped
Tomato - 1 and 1/2 of a medium tomato - Finely Chopped

Curry Leaves - 5
Mustard seeds - 1/2 Teaspoon
Jeera - 1/2 Teaspoon
Fenugreek Seeds/Vendhayam/Menthulu - A few

Turmeric - a Pinch
Chilli powder - 1 Teaspoon
Dhaniya Powder - 1 Teaspoon

Oil - 1 Tablespoon

Soak black-eyed beans overnight and pressure cook till tender. My Hawkins pressure cooker took 3 whistles.

Soak tamarind in 1/2 cup water.

Heat oil in a saucepan. Add mustard seeds and after they splutter, add jeera. Add fenugreek seeds and fry for a second. Do not let it brown. Add onion and garlic and fry till light brown. Add tomato and a pinch of salt and fry till the oil separates. Add turmeric, chilli powder and dhaniya powder. Add the beans and the tamarind water and let it simmer till it thickens a bit. You can add some more water if the curry is too thick for your taste. Add salt accordingly.

Garnish with coriander.

I use olive oil for health reasons and that too, a very small quantity. You can vary the amount as per your taste.

Wednesday, August 02, 2006

Kovil Puliyodharai

The hypnotising chant of mantras, the echo of the temple bell, the fragrance of camphor and sandalwood, the rustle of silks, the feeling of reverence and awe and the unforgettable taste of puliodharai are the evergreen memories of temples etched in my mind...Puliyodharai also known as pulihora in Telugu and Puliyogare in Kannada is a perfect blend of sourness and spices in one delectable dish... Without much ado, lets get to the recipe.

Recipe Source: My Aunt Thulasi

From Top Clockwise: Green Chillies, Tamarind, Dry Red Chillies, Coriander Seeds, Channa Dal, Urad Dal, Fenugreek Seeds, Pepper. In the Center: Sesame Seeds

Ingredients:

Cooked Rice - 1.5 Cups

Tamarind - A lemon sized ball
Dry Red Chillies - 3
Green Chillies - 4
Asofoetida - A pinch

Oil - 3 Tablespoons

For Powder:

Urad Dal - 1 1/4 Teaspoons
Channa dal - 1 1/2 Teaspoons
Dhaniya - 2 1/4 Teaspoons
Dry Red Chillies - 3
Fenugreek Seeds (Vendhayam, Menthulu) - A pinch
Black Pepper - A few

Sesame Seeds - 1.5 Tablespoons

For Seasoning:

Mustard seeds - 1/2 Teaspoon
Curry Leaves - 7 or 8
Urad dal - 1 Teaspoon
Channa dal - 1 Teaspoon

Puliodharai


Method:

Soak Tamarind in 3 cups of water, along with salt. Extract the tamarind juice and keep aside. Heat a teaspoon of oil , add asofoetida and fry dry red chillies. To this, add the tamarind extract and the green chillies and simmer on a low heat till it reaches a semi solid consistency. Keep stirring now and then.

Dry roast each of the ingredients mentioned under Powder section seperately and grind them together, except sesame seeds. Grind the roasted sesame seeds seperately.

Add all the ground powders to the tamarind extract and remove from heat. Mix the required quantity with cooked rice. Finish off with seasoning. For best results, use gingelly oil. It imparts a certain flavour to the recipe.

The puliyodharai mix has a long shelf life. Whenever necessary mix the desired quantity with cooked rice and add seasoning.

Tomato Rice

Tomato Rice
Tomato Rice used to be a staple part of my diet when I was away from home, working. Its so easy to prepare and is definitely bound to set your kitchen afire with aromatic flames!

Recipe:

Source: My Mom

Ingredients:


Clockwise: Tomato, Ginger, Garlic, Green Chillies, Onion



Cooked Rice - 1.5 Cups
Onion - 1 Big
Tomatoes - 2 Medium
Ginger - 1 Inch
Garlic - 5 Flakes
Green Chillies - 4 - 5

From Top Clockwise: Cinnamon, Cloves, Bayleaves, Saunf


Bay Leaves - 2
Cinnamon - 1 inch stick
Cloves - 3
Cardomom - 2
Saunf (Sombu) - 1/2 Teaspoon

Oil - 3 Tablespoons
Salt - As per taste
Turmeric - A pinch

Method:

First, slice the onion into thin slices, dice the tomatoes into cubes, split the green chillies and crush the ginger and garlic. Heat oil in a saucepan and add saunf, cinnamon, cloves, cardamom and bay leaves. Take care not to burn the spices. Add green chillies and fry for a minute. Add onion and saute for two minutes. Add ginger and garlic. Fry till the onions turn brown. Now add tomatoes along with salt and a pinch of turmeric. Fry till the oil separates out. Finally add the cooked rice and mix well. Garnish with chopped coriander.

A cucumber/onion/tomato raitha is a good accompaniment to this rice.

Tuesday, August 01, 2006

Buttered Vegetables

Buttered Vegetables

I love vegetables and I love any simple vegetable dish. One of my favorite's is Buttered Vegetables. It's an extremely simple dish, which can be finished in a matter of minutes. I would also call this recipe as a comfort food. It brings back all those memories of Bangalore, where I worked for lot of years, its culture and my many friends...

A word of caution has to be said that this dish is pretty bland. Yet, the enticing aroma of butter and the freshness of the vegetables makes this very appetising.

Recipe:

Ingredients:
Mixed Vegetables (Cauliflower, Broccoli, Beans, Carrot, Potato, Peas) - 1 Cup
Butter - 1 Tablespoon
Salt - As per taste
Black Pepper - As per taste.

Procedure:

First, steam the vegetables. Soften the butter to room temperature. Add the butter to the steamed vegetables. The butter will melt in the heat of the veggies. Add salt and black pepper and toss the vegetables so that the butter evenly coats them.

This recipe is also an entry for the blog event From My Rasoi - Comfort Foods hosted by Revathi of En-Ulagam.